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Fundamentals of Electrical Engineering I
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Read: 2017-03-25
Last Update: 2017-03-25

Five Sentence Abstract:

The course focuses on the creation, manipulation, transmission, and reception of information by electronic means. Elementary signal theory; time- and frequency-domain analysis; Sampling Theorem. Digital information theory; digital transmission of analog signals; error-correcting codes.

Thoughts:

Heavy focus on signals and systems theory over "practical" electronics. I would not suggest this as a first course if you are interested in EE/EECS. If you are looking for communications theory, this is perfect.

IMHO the 2007 MIT 6.002 Circuits and Electronics is a better place to start. Further, the 2011 MIT 6.01SC was also more appealing to me as it mixes the theory with a more hands on approach (python programming and robots). The next course in this Rice U series, ELEC242 I think, looks good but is not available online.

Exceptional Excerpts:

Notes:

// designates my notes.

designates important.

Chapter 1 - Introduction

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Chapter 2 - Signals and Systems

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z = a + jb = r∠θ
r = |z| = √(a2 + b2)
a = r cos (θ)
b = r sin (θ)
θ = arctan(b/a)
1
z = re^(jθ)
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These two decompositions are mathematically equivalent to each other.

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A*cos(2πft + φ) = Re[Ae^(jφ)e^(j2πft)]
A*sin(2πft + φ) = Im[Ae^(jφ)e^(j2πft)]
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s(t) = e^(−t/τ)

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        ∞ 
s(n) = sum  s(m)δ(n − m)
       m=−∞
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          t
y(t) = integral x(α)dα
          −∞
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Chapter 3 - Analog Signal Processing

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          t
E(t) =integral p(α)dα
          −∞

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p(t) = Ri^2(t) = v^2(t)/R // Instantaneous power consumption of a resistor.

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RT = R1 || (R2 || R3 + R4)

RT = (R1*R2*R3 + R1*R2*R4 + R1*R3*R4) / (R1*R2 + R1*R3 + R2*R3 + R2*R4 + R3*R4)

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  1. Even though it’s not, pretend the source is a complex exponential. We do this because the impedance approach simplifies finding how input and output are related. If it were a voltage source having voltage vin = p (t) (a pulse), still let vin = Vinej2πf t. We’ll learn how to “get the pulse back” later.

  2. With a source equaling a complex exponential, all variables in a linear circuit will also be complex exponentials having the same frequency. The circuit’s only remaining “mystery” is what each variable’s complex amplitude might be. To find these, we consider the source to be a complex number (Vin here) and the elements to be impedances.

  3. We can now solve using series and parallel combination rules how the complex amplitude of any variable relates to the sources complex amplitude.

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unsorted:

Chapter 4 - Frequency Domain

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IMAGE EQ after 4.11

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Chapter 5 - Digital Signal Processing

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Chapter 6 - Information Communication

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s0(t) = ApT(t) s1(t) = −ApT(t)

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  1. Create a vertical table for the symbols, the best ordering being in decreasing order of probability.

  2. Form a binary tree to the right of the table. A binary tree always has two branches at each node. Build the tree by merging the two lowest probability symbols at each level, making the probability of the node equal to the sum of the merged nodes’ probabilities. If more than two nodes/symbols share the lowest probability at a given level, pick any two; your choice won’t affect B (A).

  3. At each node, label each of the emanating branches with a binary number. The bit sequence obtained from passing from the tree’s root to the symbol is its Huffman code.

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FIG 6.20

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Appendix

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