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The Philosophic Corruption of Physics
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Read: 2017-03-23
Last Update: 2017-03-23

Five Sentence Abstract:

After an initial review of Newton's numerous contributions to science, his rejection of the arbitrary is likened to modern objectivism. Next the corruption begins with Hume and then Kant rejecting the primacy of existence for the primacy of conciousness. This leads then to Mach and the positivism movement essentially rejecting reality. Einstein still wanted to test reality, but instead placed another nail in the coffin of objectivism with his interpretation of the Lorentz transforms. Lastly we reach the "crowning achievement" of modern physics, quantum theory and its particle-wave duality triumphing over the little regarded pilot theory of Debroli (now resurrected by Lewis Little).

Thoughts:

Kant seems to have been one of the biggest mistakes mankind has ever encountered. Everything he touched turns to an unknowable mess even in the face of empirical evidence. I suppose it all goes to hell when your foundation is that there is no way to experience objective reality. It SEEMS like it might make sense to say your senses are filtered and the world you experience is a reflection of the unknowable objective in you subjective mind, but as we can see now it leads to the rejection of causality and acceptance of the arbitrary.

I chuckle every time I think of Goethe studying light by sitting in a dark room and dazzling himself with a bright light occasionally. Although I can't say discoveries about light couldn't be made this way, it is silly at its face value.

As to the validity of quantum mechanics, I personally don't have any real knowledge of what is going on in the field, but given its roots and my belief that some "elite" are attempting to socially engineer a world of their liking I can at least entertain the possibility that the whole exercise is to get the general public to throw their arms up and declare "there is nothing we can know, call in the technocrats".

Exceptional Excerpts:

Notes:

Part 1: (start=1:21)

Part 2: (start=1:55)

Philosophy strikes back:

Part 2: (start=2:35)

Part 3: (start=3:48)

Part 4: (start=4:50)

Part 5: (start=6:17)











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